Have you ever wondered how a mood ring’s color changes? Or what mood ring meanings might be waiting for you when the ring does change its hue?

What is a Mood Ring? How do Mood Rings Work?

Mood rings are jewelry that is comprised of thermochromic elements. These special elements are responsive to the body temperature of the person wearing the mood ring. Inventors Josh Reynolds and Maris Ambats created the first version of the mood ring. Their product was the first jewelry in the market that visually responded to the body temperature of people.

Despite the initial high price, people were excited about mood rings because they have not seen anything like it before. Silver-plated mood rings went for about $45, while the more expensive version (like the golden mood ring) retailed for an average of $250 each.

There have been some essential changes to how thermochromic rings have been made since the seventies, but the principle remains the same. Other kinds of jewelry are also manufactured with the same materials. You can now find mood bracelets and mood necklaces in the market today that perform the same way as mood rings.

 

Mood Ring Color Meanings, Color Chart

mood ring color meanings

chart of mood ring color meanings

These are the possible meanings of the changes in the color of mood rings. Remember – the liquid crystal shift to reveal a new color, and there are points between the changes in color that might hint in what a person is feeling at the moment. Below are some interpretations of the colors.

Pink – Happy

One of the happiest colors available for mood rings. Pink indicates the possibility of the person being curious and obsessed, as well as being warm and affectionate.

Orange – Nervous

Orange has a nervous inflection, so the person would likely be feeling unsettled and anxious. This can also show some momentary confusion, as when a person is unsure of how to proceed or how to make a decision. Orange emerges when a person feels upset and is challenged by circumstances when he is angry and feeling challenged.

Green/Celtic – Worry

Green may be indicative of mixed emotions, or when a person is active and dynamic in the situation but is also unsure of what to feel true. Green may also signal restlessness on the part of the wearer and possibly worry or distress. If you see a person flaring green while doing absolutely nothing, he might be irritated.

Blue – Worry

A dark blue color means the person is very relaxed and doesn’t care in the world. All forms of happiness, including being passionate and love-struck, can generate a darker blue color that resonates with being positive and generally happy. A dark blue mood ring may also be indicative that the person is in a giving mood and is feeling blissful and peaceful, too.

Light Blue – Pleasant

Light blue is the dynamic form of blue-level emotions. A person showing light blue may be ecstatic and flirtatious. He wants to do something and is giddy about it. A light blue color expresses high-level joy.

Purple – Passion

Purple is associated with all of the emotions related to passion, love, and lovemaking. This is a beautiful color, so if it appears, it means that the person is definitely in a sensual mood (not always sexual), and he may be in a dreamy mood as well.

Black – Stressed

Black is the stormiest of colors and indicates high levels of negative emotions or stress.

Brown – Cautiousness

A brown reading from a mood ring indicates a middle of the road set of emotions that may pertain to cautiousness, distracting, and similar feelings that are not entirely negative or positive.

Why Do Mood Ring Color Change?

We can treat mood rings as an alternative thermometer device, but since it doesn’t have numerical readings, it can’t be used for medical purposes. All it can show you visually is the subtle changes in body temperature that might hint at what the person might be thinking or feeling. It can be a useful indicator of what you might be feeling if you can’t grasp your emotions that often.

 

Do Mood Rings Tell Your Mood and Why?

How are mood rings made?

Mood rings have a simple structure. The liquid crystals inside the ring rearrange themselves at the molecular level when the temperature surrounding the ring rises or falls. While there are accompanying physical changes when a person’s emotions shift, these rings should not be considered a reliable indicator of a person’s mood or mindset.

At best, it hints at the possible mood changes involved as a person goes about his day. But as for exactness, it cannot be exact because skin temperature does not have a direct correlation with a person’s psychological state, much less his psychological profile.

The manufacturing process for mood rings is also as simple as its structure. Usually, you have a band of temperature-sensitive liquid crystals that have a protective outer layer.

The outer layer is usually sprayed on to ensure that the liquid crystal doesn’t leak out, and the band of liquid crystal stays on the ring with no defects. The basic principle of mood rings is when you are fearful, sad, or within any range of negative emotions, the body will direct warmer blood to the vital organs in the classic fight or flight response.

Since mood rings are placed on the extremities (i.e., on fingers), body temperature changes are more overt than on the skin, closer to the vital organs such as the skin on the chest or the belly.

This is why we tend to have cold hands and cold feet when we are not feeling well. The body conserves heat and drives all the warm and oxygen-rich blood to the brain, heart, and other more important parts of the body, leaving just the minimum to the extremities.

 

Can Mood Rings Get Wet?

Mood rings should not get wet, nor should these be submerged in any amount of water. When water gets into the bad of liquid crystals, the crystals are damaged, and the color often stays fixed at black. The sealing of the liquid crystals is not perfect, so take good care of your mood ring should you already have one. Mood rings should also be kept well away from high temperatures as they can get damaged permanently from higher temperatures.