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Are you interested in pink gemstones? The color pink occurs naturally in many kinds of gemstones; they are not all alike. Below are the most popular pink gemstone names in the world.

 

What Gemstone is Pink?

Pink Sapphire

Pink sapphire is one of the hardest minerals around, right next to the diamond. A carat can go for $700 to up to $1500, depending on the cut and quality of the gem. They can occur as truly pink gems or purplish-pink stones.

The deeper the color saturation, the more expensive the gems become. All kinds of sapphire belong to the gem corundum subset, and have a Mohs rating of nine, making them just a little less durable than the diamond, which ranks at number one for hardness.

Morganite

Morganite is characterized as being an exclusive and sought-after gemstone for jewelry. It has viable medium durability, which makes it perfect for standard jewelry settings like rings and pendants.

Jewelers often process morganite because it adds a strong touch of feminine to any jewelry piece. The morganite is also known in the gem world as the pink beryl or the pink emerald, though it is not an emerald. The pink hues in morganite come from magnesium and cesium inclusions.

Pink Opal

Pink opal is known as the most colorful precious stone in the world. It has the most natural schiller that involves a full spectrum of colors. Opal naturally occurs as a translucent stone because of its water content, which is probably the highest among all minerals.

Pink opals are often the products of laboratory synthesis and processing. While these opals will have an intense pink hue, the play of color remains when you shift the stone’s position just a little.

Rhodochrosite

Rhodochrosite is one of the softest minerals in our countdown, but it is no less appealing. Rhodochrosite features a banded structure, with layers of different colors across the gemstone.

While it has a cleavage, Rhodochrosite is a soft mineral that cannot be compared to minerals like sapphire. Lower quality pink rhodochrosite can retail for $200 per carat, while the higher quality ones with better color saturation and clarity can cost up to $500 per carat. This mineral has a beautiful red-rose color that is incomparable to other color manifestations in other minerals.

Pink Spinel

Pink spinel is one of the rarest natural pink crystals in the world, and it features unique internal inclusions that make it stand out from the rest of the pink pack.

Pink spinel wasn’t correctly identified until recently. It was often confused as pink sapphire until proper confirmatory tests showed that it was another crystal altogether. It has high durability as well, and because of its rarity, a carat of pink spinel can cost anywhere from $200 to a high of $1,500 depending on the cut and clarity of the piece.

Rose Quartz

Rose-Quartz

While more abundant than other kinds of minerals in this list, the Mother of Lovestone rose, quartz is no less valuable to energy practitioners and those who believe its metaphysical properties. Rose quartz can be bought affordably for less than $10 per pound.

It has excellent transparency that lends well to different types of jewelry settings and has an average level of brilliance – good enough for engagement rings and wedding rings. With the right cut and polish, the rose quartz stands perfectly against the backdrop of other pink gems.

Kunzite

Kunzite

Kunzite is another little-known pink gem that deserves more attention because of its natural beauty. It was first  described in the US, and its main feature is the depth and intensity of its colors. It is an opaque gemstone and occurs in three primary colors – purple, colorless, and pink.

Pink Fluorite

Pink fluorite is often tumbled or made into cute cabochons. It is considered a prime heart stone and is recommended for energy healing involving love and relationships. Pink fluorite has unique inclusions and a lighter pink shade than rose quartz.

Pink Chalcedony

Pink chalcedony is another abundant gemstone that is mined in different countries. Its abundance means it is less expensive than top stones like pink spinel or pink sapphire.

Pink chalcedony showcases brighter pastel colors that are lighter and warmer to look at. It has a luster that can be described as glassy or waxy. Pink chalcedony is also usually processed into cabochons for a variety of jewelry settings.

Rhodonite

rhodonite

The extremely distinct rhodonite has an almost raspberry texture that makes it easy to identify. Its name is derived from a Grecian word, “rhodon,” which means “rosy-colored.” Rhodonite occurs in various shades of pink and red. The best ones have a deep pink color with appropriate texturing thanks to its unique inclusions and patterns.

Thulite

Thulite is a variety of zoisite that has a disturbingly vivid pink color. It was first mined in Norway, but today, more deposits have been in the United States.

Like the rhodonite, this mineral has dendritic veins on the surface that give the stone a lot of character. Thulite is naturally eye-catching because of its internal characteristics and looks lovely on jewelry.

Because of its Mohs rating, it is not recommended for bracelets and rings because the mineral might chip if you knock it too hard, or drop it. However, necklaces, pendants, and earrings are a hit because they’re not exposed to the same level of impact as other jewelry.

Malaya Garnet

The Malaya or Malaia pink garnet is a beautiful specimen of garnet that has excellent clarity and color saturation, fit for most applications. Unlike other gemstones, the value per carat of a Malaya gem increases when the hue lightens instead of deepens. These gems have been around since the 1970s, and they continue to enchant the world of gems and jewelry. The Malaya gem belongs to one of the most extensive mineral families known to gemology.